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Talk To Frank

What Is Talk To Frank?

Talk To Frank is an anti-drugs campaign in the United Kingdom that has been running for the longest time. Yet, has it halted anybody taking drugs?

A police Swat team in the UK burst into a kitchen of a quiet suburban home, and the results were a complete turnaround of the way drug education was done for good. The doom and gloom teachings coupled with pushing to keep away from the drug pushers who are everywhere was thrown out. In came the quirky funny side and a light-hearted attitude.


In the main advertisement, an adolescent kid brings in a police grab squad to capture his mom when she recommends they have a tranquil chat about medications. There was also a new message: Drugs are illegal. Talking about the isn't. So talk to Frank."


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

Thought up by promotion organization Mother, Frank was, indeed, the new name for the National Drugs Helpline. It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. The quests of Pablo, the dog that's used as a substance mule, to a tour around a brain warehouse have been put forward under the Frank name, making it a well-known trade name amongst the youth of the nation.


According to Justin Tindal, the creative director of Leo Burnett the ad agency, what is of more importance is the fact that no-one ever saw Frank physically, so it was difficult for mockers to pick on him or blame him for not treating the kids right. Even the sham Frank videos on YouTube are moderately deferential. As there is nothing that remotely suggests Frank is a government project, the campaign is viewed as a first occurrence funded by the government.

Drugs instruction has progressed significantly since Nancy Reagan, and in the UK, the cast of Grange Hill asked adolescents to "Simply Say No" to drugs, a movement which numerous specialists now considers was counterproductive.


Frank has set the standard, and now most adverts in Europe are using the same format to equip the youth with unbiased facts to help in making their choices. In nations with solid punishments for ownership, pictures of jail bars and disgraced guardians are still typical. A recent campaign launched in Singapore informed young people who visit clubs, "You play, you pay".

In the UK, the Above the Influence campaign has cost the federal government millions of dollars and uses humour and cautionary stories to encourage people to choose positive alternatives to drugs In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. Though, an unexpected number of anti-drug campaigns all over the globe still resort back to strategies intended to arouse fear or alarm, specifically the substance-fuelled plunge to hell. One example is one of the DrugsNot4Me series in Canada that revealed how a very pretty confident woman slipped into deep-eyed wreck because of drugs.

Ads that reveal the dangers of drug abuse mostly push frustrated people into experimenting with drugs, according to a data from the anti-drugs campaign of the UK from 1999 to 2004.


The opposition Conservative politicians were initially against Frank, simply because it pointed out the ups and downs of drug use, but it made giant strides.


Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world was one of its preliminary ads online.

It was not generally simple to get the balance of the message accurate. According to the then creative director of digital agency Profero, Matt Powell, who designed the ad, he was wrong in believing that a normal web user has an adequate attention span. The negative effects were given at the end of the animated ad and some viewers might not have watched the whole thing. However, Powell claims the objective was to be more open with youngsters regarding substances, in an attempt to form the credibility of the Frank image.

The Home Office says 67% of youngsters in a study said they would swing to Frank in the event that they required drug guidance. Frank helpline received 225,892 phone calls and 3,341,777 hits on the website in the period 2011-2012. For him, this shows that the campaign is very successful.

Though the response is good, it is no evidence that Frank just like other available anti-drug campaigns has discouraged people from indulging in drugs.

During the decade that the Frank campaign was introduced, drug abuse figures in the UK have reduced by 9%; however, much of the decline has been attributed to a reduction in the use of cannabis as the more youth shun smoking tobacco.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national service that offers drug education and was formed in 2003 by the Department of Health in partnership with Home Office of the British government. It was designed to lower the rate of both legal and illegal drug use by providing education to teenagers and young people about what the effects of using drug and alcohol could be. It has run numerous media promotions on radio and the web.


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Services

FRANK provides the following services for people who seek information and/or advice about drugs:

  • A website
  • A 24 hour telephone line that is strictly confidential
  • Email
  • An anonymous live chat every afternoon 2-6pm
  • A service to find treatment and counselling