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Getting Help - Treatment

Defining Drug Addiction

Substance dependency is a chronic illness that is identified by uncontrollable substance seeking and use, regardless of the harmful effects and alterations in the brain that can be permanent. The harmful habits of people suffering from drug addiction come as a result of these changes inside the brain. It's also easy to relapse back into drug addiction. Relapsing is when a person starts to use drugs again after he/she attempted to quit.


Addiction starts when the decision to take drugs is first made. However, over time, it becomes increasingly difficult for the person not to do so. The desire to search for and make use of drugs will now rely on a very huge urge. This is generally because of the impacts of long haul drug exposure on brain work. The parts of the brain messed up by the drug dependency are the ones dealing with recompense and inspiration, knowledge and recollection, and responsible actions.

The workings of the human brain, coupled with human behaviour are altered by addiction.


Can Substance Dependency Be Treated?

It can, however it is hard. Drug dependency is a long-time illness from which it is not possible to quit at will and remain clean. For most patients, long term often repeated care is needed to help them stop using and continue on to get their lives back.


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The addicts must be assisted to achieve certain things through the treatment for addiction, and they include:

  • stop using the substances
  • Remaining drug-free
  • be profitable in the family, at work and in the public arena

Essentials Of Successful Treatment

These values have been observed since some scientific research was done in the mid-70s as the foundation for a successful recovery plan:

  • Dependency is an intricate, but treatable illness which affects the functioning of the brain and behaviour.
  • There is no particular treatment that is fitting for all.
  • Treatment needs to be readily available.
  • The entire needs of the patient, not only drug use issues, should be delivered by a good treatment plan.
  • Going through with the programme is essential.
  • Advising and other behavioural treatments are the most usually used types of treatment.
  • Medications are regularly an imperative component of treatment, particularly when consolidated with behavioural therapies.
  • In order to accommodate the needs of the patient, treatment methods must be appraised with changes in the patient's needs.
  • Some other associated mental problems must be taken care of by treatments.
  • The first stage, medically assisted detoxification, is only the beginning of treatment.
  • Involuntary treatment for addiction can also be effective.
  • Substance use during treatment should be observed constantly.
  • Patients in treatment should be tested for a variety of infectious diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, and tuberculosis and also receive education about how to reduce the risk of getting thee illnesses.

What Steps Are Involved In Treating Addiction?

There are several steps to effective treatment:

  • Detoxification (the way a body is cleaned of toxins and drug residue)
  • behavioural counselling
  • medication (for tobacco, opioid, or alcohol addiction)
  • Diagnosis and management mental illness associated with drug addiction such as hopelessness and nervousness
  • Avoiding relapse by providing long term follow up care

Great results can be realised with the customised medical care plan and support services.


Depending on the level of need, mental health services should be added to the medical aspect of any treatment. The follow-up can compromise family- or community-based recovery support systems.


How Are Medications Used In Drug Addiction Treatment?

Medication can be employed to deal with withdrawal symptoms, treat co-occurring conditions and prevent a relapse.

  • Withdrawal During the detoxification process, medication helps suppress the physical reactions. Detoxification is not in itself "treatment," rather just the initial phase all the while. Patients who only go through detoxification and don't have any additional treatment typically relapse back into drug use. According to a study, 80% of detoxifications used medications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Preventing A Relapse Medicines used in the detoxing programme help the brain to restore to its normal functions easier and stop the desire for the drug. Various medicines are used for narcotics (pain killers), tobacco (nicotine) and alcohol dependency. Medications that could be used in treating cannabis (marijuana) and stimulant (cocaine, methamphetamine) addiction are being developed by scientists at present. A person who uses more than one substance, which is really typical, require treatment for every substance he/she uses.

How Are Behavioural Therapies Used To Treat Drug Addiction?

Behavioural treatments aid patients:

  • change his/her behaviour and attitude related to the substance use
  • Learn to exercise healthy life skills
  • carry on with other kinds of treatment, like medication

A patient can get treatment in several different environments using different approaches.

In an outpatient treatment programme, the recovering addict attends therapy sessions on appointed times. Individual and group therapy, or a combination of both are involved in most treatment programs.


These projects normally offer types of behavioural treatment, for example,

  • Cognitive behavioural therapy, which teaches patients how to recognize, avoid, and deal with any situation that will make them more likely to use drugs
  • Multidimensional family treatment created for young people with drug abuse issues and their families which addresses a scope of impacts on their drug mishandle designs and is intended to enhance general family working
  • Motivational interviewing has been used to prepare a patient to accept their problem and wants to change their actions by seeking help
  • Motivational impetuses (possibility management), which utilizes uplifting feedback to support restraint from medications

Treatment is once in awhile escalated at to begin with, where patients go to numerous outpatient sessions every week. After the completion of the in-depth treatment, a patient moves to frequent outpatient treatment, which does not meet as regularly and for fewer hours every week to assist with maintaining his/her recovery.


Inpatient or private treatment can likewise be extremely compelling, particularly for those with more serious issues (including co-happening conditions). 24-hour planned and organised care system, coupled with proper medical care and safe housing are given in residential treatment facilities that are licensed. Several approaches to therapies that are mainly designed to assist the patients to achieve a life that is free of drugs and crime after treatment are applied by residential treatment facilities.


The following are some examples of residential treatment settings are:

  • In the period it takes for the patient to recover, usually six to twelve months, the patient becomes a member of the community at the therapeutic facility. The whole group, including treatment staff and those in recuperation, approach as key specialists of progress, affecting the patient's states of mind, comprehension and practices related with drug utilisation.
  • Also available are short blood cleansing programmes offered at the residential facilities to rid the body of drugs and set the foundation for a longer treatment programme.
  • Recovery housing that offers supervised, short-term accommodation for a patient, frequently after other kinds of inpatient/residential treatment. Recovery housing is a great way to help people treatment go back to having an independent life while still having support with things like managing finances, finding employment, and locating support services.

Difficulties Of Re-Passage

Substance abuse alters the functioning of the brain, and several things can activate a craving for the substance within the brain. It's basic for those in treatment, particularly those treated at an inpatient centre or jail, to figure out how to identify, ignore and adapt to triggers they are probably going to be presented to after treatment.